New Order

NS Spirituality

Faith of the Future

          "Wir sind nicht die Letzten von gestern, sondern die Ersten von morgen." 
                                                                                                                      — H. Sündermann

I. Idea and Civilization

Every great culture, every civilization — every human order of any significance, in fact — has a polar ideology, or mythos, which furnishes the emotional, suprarational foundation for that particular order. The life and destiny of a culture are inseparable from such a nuclear idea. It serves as a formative pole, which during a culture's vital period provides for a unity of political, religious and cultural expression.

There are numerous examples. In ancient Egypt, the singular concept of the ka found its cultural elaboration in the construction of the pyramids. In a similar manner, Taoism combined with Confucianism and Buddhism to form the spiritual core of traditional Chinese culture, just as the cult life of the Japanese revolved around Shinto, and just as Islam furnished the spiritual matrix for a cultural flowering in the Near East during the Middle Ages. Among Indo-Europeans, it was the Vedic tradition which formed the basis for an exquisite Hindu civilization, while a pantheon of Classical gods and heroes presided over the destinies of ancient Hellas and Rome.

If one now turns to the West,* one cannot avoid the conclusion that it is the Christian worldview which stands at the heart of this particular culture.* Indeed, its very symbol is the towering Gothic cathedral. In its art, its architecture, its music, literature and philosophy, the West is pervaded by the omnipresence of Christianity. In the magnificent frescoes of Michelangelo, in the polyphonic rhythms of Vivaldi and Bach, the literary masterpieces of Dante, Chaucer and Milton, the philosophy of Thomas Aquinas, Kant and Hegel — in all of this, the heavy backdrop of Christianity looms unmistakably against the cultural horizon.

Even figures such as Shakespeare, Rembrandt, Mozart, Beethoven, Wagner and Schopenhauer — even Voltaire and Nietzsche! — whose creative daemon transcended Church dogma in noticeable fashion — even they are witness to the ineluctable presence of the Christian idea as a cultural fact. And even if one contends that the works of these personalities had nothing to do with Christian doctrine as such, but derived their ultimate inspiration from other sources, the very fact that such an argument is put forth at all constitutes the most conclusive proof that Christianity is, indeed, the mythos of Western culture, the core idea around which all cultural expression revolves. For even when its fundamental tenets have been challenged and disbelieved, it has continued to qualify the cultural milieu and furnish the central reference point for thought and action.

It is not without significance that those two major languages of Western thought — German and English — should have received their modern form from a translation of the Christian Bible; that the main function of the first Western universities was to teach Christian theology; and that natural science — that domain so uniquely fascinating to the Aryan intellect, which has come to challenge the very foundations of traditional faith itself — began very humbly as the quiet, conscientious study of the world of the Christian creator. All of this is but eloquent testimony that the Christian worldview does, indeed, form the spiritual matrix — the nuclear center — of Western culture.

II. Christianity and the West

When Christianity in its Nicene form first made its appearance amongst the Germanic peoples of Northern Europe, the future progenitors of the West greeted the new doctrine with considerable suspicion and less than full enthusiasm. For their part, they felt more comfortable with their own indigenous gods and beliefs than with the strange new import from out of the East. Even with the accretion of Hellenistic and Roman elements during its migration from Judea, Christianity — with its underlying Oriental/Semitic character — remained essentially alien to the personality and disposition of the proud Teuton. Within the soul of our ancient forebears, the very concept of original sin was perceived as unreasonable and perverse, just as calls for pacifism and self-abnegation were regarded as demeaning to their inherent dignity.

The inborn religiosity — Frömmigkeit — of these men of the North involved values of personal honor and loyalty, upright manliness, courage and heroism, honesty, truthfulness, reason, proportion, balance and self-restraint, coupled with pride of race, a questing spirit and a profound respect for the natural world and its laws — ideas representative of a worldview which the early Christian missionaries found incompatible with their own doctrine and which they proceeded to condemn as heathen.

If they displayed but little inclination to embrace the new faith, these early Teutons were by the same token not unaccommodating in their attitude. With characteristic Nordic tolerance in such matters, they were perfectly willing to permit the peaceful coexistence of a foreign god alongside the natural deities of their own folk.

For its part, however, the intruding new doctrine — impelled by a hitherto-unknown Semitic spirit of hatred and intolerance — commenced to demand the elimination of all competitors, insisting that homage be rendered to but one jealous god, the former Jewish tribal god Yahweh, or Jehovah, and to his son. Alien in its doctrine, the Creed of Love now felt obliged to employ equally alien methods to achieve its purposes. Under the auspices of the sword and accompanied by mass extermination, Christian conversion now made great strides where formerly peaceful persuasion had failed. In this manner, for example, were the tender mercies of the Christian savior disclosed to Widukind's Saxons and Olaf Tryggvason's Norsemen. If it was hypocritical and inherently contradictory, it was nevertheless effective, and all of Europe was thereby saved for Christianity.

                                                                        *   *   *

It would be a mistake, however, to assume that only through force and violence did Christianity prevail. In the propagation of its doctrine and the fulfillment of what it considered to be its holy mission, the Church displayed amazing flexibility and suppleness. It was not loath, for instance, to adopt and adapt for its own purposes as it deemed appropriate certain aspects of ancient heathendom, particularly those which were most firmly footed in the folk experience of our early forebears. Not only did this serve as an aid in the conversion process, making the Christian notion more palatable to the Nordic prospect, but it was also useful in inducing greater conformity and submission on the part of those already converted.

Especially during the reign of Pope Gregory did this policy receive definitive sanction. Former heathen holy places were appropriate as sites for the new chapels, churches and shrines. The Northern winter solstice celebration, Yule, was arbitrarily selected as the official birthday of the Christian savior. The spring celebration of reawakening Nature, Easter, was designated as the time of the Christian resurrection following the Jewish Passover. The summer solstice celebration, Midsummer, was transmogrified into the Feast of St. John, accompanied by the traditional rites of fire and water. In similar manner were other ancient festivals taken over and transformed: Whitsuntide, or High May, became the Day of Pentecost; the Celtic festival of Samhain became All Hallows' Eve; and Lent, acquiring Christian coloration, recalled a former season of the same name.

Not only was Christian adaptation confined to sacred days alone, however; it extended to heathen deities, customs and symbols, as well. A multiplicity of saints and angels, for example — came to replace the various gods and heroes of pre-Christian times. Ritual infant-sprinkling became Christian baptism, or "christening," just as the salubrious effect of holy water generally was quickly discovered by the new faith. Similarly, the lighted tree and evergreen decoration at Christmas time were taken over virtually intact from previous heathen custom. Even the Cross itself was adapted from pre-Christian sources, replacing the Fish, Dove and Star as the emblem of the faith — a fact which led to considerable distress and controversy when it was first introduced in the early Church!

And so, in addition to those Hellenistic, Roman and Babylonian elements which already overlaid an original Jewish nucleus, a Northern component was now added to the spiritual mélange which was to become medieval Christianity. With all of these accretions, however,it was essentially the outer form of the faith which was affected and modified; the inner substance of the doctrine retained its basically Oriental/Semitic character. If the new creed was not particularist like its Judaic parent, this had to do with its conceived leveling function among non-Jews. For what had originally been an exclusively Jewish sect had become — at the instance of the erstwhile Pharisee Saul/Paul — a universal creed directed at the Aryan world, denying the validity of all racial, ethnic and personal distinctions.

Thus it was, that out of this alien germ, there emerged the faith which was to form the spiritual mold of Western culture.

     * In referring to the West, we mean that manifestation of European culture
    
which emerged following the collapse of the Classical civilizations of Greece
     and Rome
and which assumed definitive form in the time of Charlemagne
     around AD 800.

III. The Decline of Christianity

The imposition of Christianity on the Aryan peoples of Northern Europe had one lasting effect. It resulted in an inner tension, a dis­quiet—an angst—which has been a protruding feature of Western culture from its inception. Throughout the history of the West, there has always existed a soul struggle keenly felt by the more perceptive spirits of the race, occasioned by the contradiction between the in­verted values and tenets of an Oriental/Semitic belief system on the one hand and the natural religious feeling of Nordic/Aryan man on the other. If the former furnished the ideological matrix of the culture, it was the latter which provided the creative inspiration, the divine spark. Indeed, the greatest moments of Western culture as a manifes­tation of Aryan genius—whether expressed in a specifically Chris­tian or extra-Christian form—occurred despite the stricture of Church dogma, rather than because of it. Dante, Chaucer, Spenser, Shake­speare, Milton, Goethe, Schiller, Shelley, Wordsworth, Keats, Byron, Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, Botticelli, Dürer and Rembrandt all testify to this, no less than do Vivaldi, Bach, Handel, Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Wagner and Bruckner.

As we have seen, the external character of Christianity was great­ly modified in its metamorphosis from a small Jewish cult into the mighty religion of the West. The medieval institution known as chivalry, in fact, with its refined honor code—which save for its Christian trappings more properly reflected the outlook and mores of a pre-Christian time—resulted from this very process, and provid­ed a modus vivendi for opposing spiritual interests during the Mid­dle Ages. Thus, through a mutual accommodation of sorts was the underlying contradiction largely contained. And yet despite any insti­tutional adjustment, the unease deriving from an alien idea remained latent within the fabric of the culture.

The social and intellectual response to this inner tension varied. For their part, the kings, emperors and other secular rulers tended to treat the matter with cynical detachment, accommodating and offering resistance as political requirements dictated.

Among scholars and thinkers, on the other hand, there were those who, like Giordano Bruno, rose in open revolt against Church dogma. More often, however, the stirrings of disquiet were manifested in subtle attempts to orient Christian doctrine toward innate Aryan religiosity. This was particularly true of the mystics of the Middle Ages, like Scotus Erigena, Amalric of Bena and Meister Eckhart, who—going beyond the theology of the Church—looked inward into their own souls and to Nature itself to discover the kingdom of God.

It was with the Renaissance, however, that there appeared the most significant movement to challenge Church doctrine—a move­ment which would, in fact, set in motion an irreversible chain of events leading ultimately to the discrediting of that very doctrine as the core idea of a culture. Now, for the first time, was the Promethean impulse able to break out of the clerical mold. Art came to express, not merely a sterile Semitic outlook, but the feelings of a Northern racial soul—a most notable development, which announced that creative vitality had stepped beyond the mythic prescriptions of the culture. The entire Judeo-Christian cosmology was called into ques­tion by new discoveries in the natural and physical sciences. Explo­ration across unknown seas commenced.

Perhaps the most revolutionary single development of this time, however, was the discovery of movable type by Johann Gutenberg, which enabled a much wider circulation of knowledge—knowledge other than that bearing an ecclesiastical imprimitur, knowledge tran­scending the basic ideology of the culture.

                                                                      * * *

The most important consequence of the Gutenberg invention is to be seen in the Protestant Reformation, to which it was a contribut­ing factor and whose development it greatly influenced. Up until the time of Martin Luther, the focus of Christian authority was the Pa­pacy, whose word was unquestioned in matters of faith and dogma. Now, with the great schism in Christendom, a direct challenge was presented to ecclesiastical authority. It certainly was not, of course, the intent of Luther and the other dissenters to undermine or elimi­nate the Christian faith; rather the opposite. They merely wished to reform it. And yet, by challenging the one unifying institution of Christendom and causing a split in Christian ranks, they inadvertent­ly opened the door to disbelief in the Christian mythos itself.

To replace papal authority in matters religious, Luther proposed to substitute the authority of the Book; and so, with the prospect of employing the Gutenberg invention, he undertook the prodigious task of translating obscure Hebrew scriptures into the German lan­guage—to the everlasting misfortune of Christianity. It is ironic that in his quest for spiritual freedom, the Great Reformer should have rejected the despotism of the Papacy only to embrace the tyranny of the Torah and the ancient Jewish prophets. The arcane texts which had remained on musty shelves behind cloistered walls arid acces­sible only to priests and theologians now became universal property. And now, instead of one single authority in matters of Christian exe­gesis, everyone—and no one—became an authority. Out of this there could be but one result: contradiction and confusion.

The effect on intelligent minds, of course, was devastating. For here it was now possible—in the best Talmudic fashion—to prove mutually exclusive points of view by reference to the same Semitic texts. Not only that, but critical examination of biblical literature gave rise to serious doubt concerning the veracity and validity of the subject matter itself, not to mention the peculiar mentality of its various authors. For the first time, perceptive minds could observe the obvious contradiction between empirical reality and what was claimed as holy writ.

Gradually there grew the inner realization that the faith itself was flawed, and creative genius began to look beyond the ideology of the Church for inspiration and direction. Even in those instances where Christian motifs continued to provide the external form for artistic expression—such as in the works of Bach, Corelli and Rubens, for example—the vital daemon which spoke was clearly extra-Christian and of a religious order transcending Church dogma.

And so even the Counter Reformation, and the stylistic mode it inspired, succumbed to widening skepsis. A lessening of traditional belief had set in, and Aryan creativity now began to look increasingly in other directions for the divine. At the intellectual level, philosophy—which had long separated itself from theology—pursued its own independent quest for truth, while at the artistic level a succession of stylistic periods— impelled by irrepressible inner tension—sought ever newer forms of expression. Thus, the Baroque, having exploited all of its possibili­ties, gave way to the Rococo and the Classical, which in turn yielded to the Romantic of the 19th century and to the Impressionist, which has now been succeeded by the Modern era—which concludes the his­torical experience of the West.

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Today, Christianity has reached its final stage. From both a spir­itual and a scientific standpoint, its fundamental beliefs have be­come untenable. The advances of Aryan science have forever shat­tered the old Jewish myths. The cumulative impact of such figures as Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler, Newton and Darwin could not be eter­nally suppressed by ecclesiastical edict. When Church dogma, for example, insisted that the Earth was the center of the universe and scientific investigation demonstrated otherwise, Aryan man was compelled by his innate regard for the truth to accept the latter at the expense of the former. In so doing, he came to question all other aspects of a once-sacrosanct belief system.

For the modern Church, this poses an impossible dilemma. The more it adheres to its fundamental doctrines, the more preposterous they must appear and the quicker will be its demise. On the other hand, once it attempts to reconcile itself with the findings of science by reinterpreting and redefining its basic tenets, it automatically con­cedes its moral position and its very reason for existence as an arbiter of truth.

The fact is that Christianity, as the dominant ideology of the West, has failed. It has exhausted all of its historical possibilities. No longer does it carry the emotional, mythic, polarizing force necessary to direct the spiritual life of a culture. Indeed, it is a spent cultural force no longer capable of adapting successfully to new organic realities.

All of this can be readily seen in the emptiness and sterility of modern cultural expression—reflecting the absence of any real spir­itual values—as well as in the secularization of the Christian idea it­self into liberal democracy and Marxism. Especially is this to be noted in the self-devaluation process of ecumenism and interfaith/inter-ideological dialogue, which constitutes the clearest concession by Christianity that it has failed and no longer has anything vital to offer. For once the Church admits that its doctrines are coequal with those of the nonbeliever, then what reason is there to be a believer?

It is not without significance that while the influence of Christi­anity is waning in the West, it is—through the sheer force of demo­graphic pressure—gaining souls and expanding among nonwhites. Not only is this particularly true in Latin America, but also in Africa and—to a lesser extent—in Asia as well. This development has, of course, not escaped the notice of the Church, which—with obsequi­ous interracial posturing and attempts to divorce itself from its his­torical Western setting—has chosen to redirect the Christian appeal toward the colored world as the primary area of its interest and concern. In abandoning its Western role, however, Christianity has announced its conclusion as a cultural force. And so, whatever it may have traditionally represented for past generations of Europeans and North Americans no longer obtains.

Accordingly, it would be a mistake to assume that the Judeo-­Christian idea has anything to offer the white peoples in their contem­porary struggle for survival—that it might in any way be capable of addressing the vital needs and concerns of endangered Aryan life on this planet. What now exists in the name of Christianity—apart from certain nostalgic, retrograde attempts to revive a historical corpse in a world of uncertainty and personal insecurity—is nothing more than fossil formalism and sterile nominalism without genuine vitality or substance, reflecting the marginal relevance of this particular ideol­ogy in today’s society. For in the face of modern realities, the Christian worldview simply has nothing more to say. It has fulfilled its historic role; it is now moribund. At best, it is irrelevant. At worst, it is an avowed enemy, a deadly menace to the Aryan race and its survival.

It may well be argued that the worst consequences of such ideo­logical and spiritual error were far less conspicuous before the Sec­ond World War. Does the same hold true today, however, when the final effects of that error can be plainly seen? For well over a mil­lenium now, Christianity has held a monopoly as the self-proclaimed custodian of the spiritual and moral well-being of an entire cultural order—for which one must reasonably assume that it has accepted concomitant responsibility. What, then, are the fruits of its spiritual regime? We see them all around us. They are the symptoms of a diseased civilization: decadence, degeneracy, depravity, corruption, pollution, egoism, hedonism, materialism, Marxism and ultimately—atheism. Yes, atheism. By destroying whatever natural religious feeling once existed in the hearts of our people and substituting alien myths and superstitions, it must now bear full responsibility for the diminished capacity for spiritual belief among our folk.

It will perhaps be objected that the Church itself is opposed to all of the above indesiderata. I am sorry; the responsibility for what has been claimed as a divine charge cannot be so easily evaded. Words aside, these happen to be the actual results of its earthly reign.

The Promethean spirit of Aryan man, for its part, must now look in other directions.



THE FOREGOING are the first three chapters of this unique treatise. Four additional chapters include: "Twilight of the West"; "The Tragedy of 1945"; "Worldview of a New Age"; and "The Faith of Adolf Hitler."  

Faith of the Future was originally published in the Spring 1982 issue of The NATIONAL SOCIALIST, a publication of the World Union of National Socialists, under the title "Hitlerism: Faith of the Future" and subsequently issued in booklet form under its current title. 

     The historian, Dr. Peter H. Peel, spoke glowingly of the essay as "pure beauty
     and truth and an insight made comprehensible to all who are receptive. Now I
     can see that there is no incongruity in a vision of Hitler as both man and divine
     archetype — the instrument of Aryan destiny."

     One Michigan college student declared: "Never before in such a short article
     have I found such a pristine and powerful message ... The many pieces of life's
     jigsaw-puzzle have come together."

     Aryan ideologue and mystic Savitri Devi wrote: "Nothing ... could have given
     me as much joy as your outstanding, objective and brilliant article ... I got from
     you, through your prophetic vision of tomorrow (and your dispassionate de-
     scription of today) an immense, more-than-personal surely, but also personal
     feeling of victory ... For a time I lost sight and consciousness of [my surround-
     ings] and felt all around me, spreading over the old and new continents and the
     smoking ruins of the Old Order, those I called for with all my heart in 1945. And
     from their midst I felt the strong, unfettered youth of tomorrow rushing forth ...
     Your beautiful article haunts me. I have read and re-read it several times,
     always with renewed elation and feeling of victory."

For a copy of Faith of the Future in its entirety in booklet form contact:
NS Publications, PO Box 188, Wyandotte MI 48192 / nspub@tds.net.

Building a better world for future aryan generations